Pinetop Smith

From Bhamwiki

Jump to: navigation, search

Clarence "Pinetop" Smith (born June 11, 1904 in Orion, Pike County; died March 15, 1929 in Chicago, Illinois) was a boogie-woogie and blues pianist, best known for his 1928 recording of http://www.hermandaddelrociodelamacarena.com/online-generic-cialis "Pine Top's Boogie Woogie."

Smith was born in the community of Orion, north of Troy in Pike County. He earned his nickname as a child for his habit of climbing trees. He began working as a pianist for house parties in Troy and soon moved to Birmingham, where he sometimes worked with Robert McCoy. In 1919 he was credited as a member of "Mattie Dorsey's Big Four" at an appearance in Memphis, Tennessee. In 1920 he moved to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and toured as a singer, pianist and comedian in minstrel shows and on the T.O.B.A. vaudeville circuit. He also lived for a while in St Louis, Missouri and Omaha, Nebraska. At various times he accompanied blues stars like Ma Rainey or Butterbeans and Susie.

In the mid-1920s fellow pianist and Alabama native Cow Cow Davenport recommended him to Mayo Williams of Brunswick/Vocalion Records in Chicago's Furniture Mart. Smith moved there with his wife, Sarah, and their first son, sharing a Prairie Avenue rooming house with Albert Ammons and levitra sales in canada'>levitra sales in canada Meade "Lux" Lewis and working a regular gig at the Forestville Tavern. Ammons and Pete Johnson credited Smith as a key influence in the emerging "boogie woogie" style. He recorded his "Pine Top's Boogie Woogie" during a session on December 29, 1928. The title of the http://it.curu.ca/generic-cialis-from-canada hit song helped popularize the style, and give it a name.

Smith had a second session for Vocalion on January 1415, 1929 and made another unissued record on only today best viagra prices March 13. He was shot to death by accident by a man trying to i recommend cialis england break up a melee at a dance in Chicago's Prince Hall Masonic Temple on Orleans Street.

"Pine Top's Boogie Woogie" was re-recorded by Cleo Brown in 1935, and introduced to the wider public as "The Original Boogie-Woogie" by Tommy Dorsey and his Orchestra in 1938. Following World War II, Dorsey's recording became a best-seller and the tune was re-recorded by Bing Crosby. Joe Willie Perkins' 1950 re-recording became so famous that the singer's name changed to Pinetop Perkins. Over time, Perkins often received credit for originating Smith's tune.

A memorial to Smith, designed by sculptor Claes Oldenburg, was erected near the site of http://www.fgedu.com/purchase-cialis-online his death in 1967. Smith was posthumously inducted into the Alabama Jazz Hall of Fame in 1991.

[edit] References

  • Du Noyer, Paul (2003) The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Music Fulham, London: Flame Tree Publishing ISBN 1904041965 p. 165
  • Edwards, James (Fall 2007) Western Pennsylvania History. pp. 6-7
  • Silvester, Peter J. (2009) The Story of Boogie-Woogie: A Left Hand Like God. 2nd ed. Scarecrow Press ISBN 0810869241

[edit] External links

Personal tools