Grady Barbour

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Grady F. W. Barbour is a retired Episcopal priest, founder of the Cathedral OutReach Program and Urban Services (CORPUS), and rector of several small parishes on short assignment. He retired from the pulpit of St Michael's Episcopal Church in Huffman in 2009.

Barbour grew up in West Virginia and played competitive tennis. He continued playing as a student at the University of Miami where he studied human relations. After graduation he spent a year at the General Theological Seminary in New York before leaving to work in business in Atlanta, Georgia.

In 1969 Barbour resumed his seminary training at the Virginia Theological Seminary, graduating in 1973. He served as vicar for the Church of the Transfiguration in Buckhannon, West Virginia for six years and also trained in Clinical Pastoral Education at the Weston State Hospital. He continued as an ACPE resident at the University of Virginia Medical Center in Charlottesville and also trained at the Crownsville Psychiatric and Research Center in Crownsville, Maryland, attaining full certification in 1986 while working as a full-time chaplain at Johns Hopkins Medical Center and the Frances Scott Key Medical Center in Baltimore.

In October of 1986 Barbour was called to found a ministry to the downtown Birmingham business community through the Cathedral Church of the Advent. The result was CORPUS, which combined outreach with a program in clinical pastoral education. He left the Advent to supervise the creation of a CPE program at Children's Hospital and served as a supply priest and interim rector at various parishes in the Episcopal Diocese of Alabama.

Barbour was interim rector at St Matthias’ Episcopal Church in Tuscaloosa and rector of the South Talladega Episcopal Ministry. At one point he took secular work as a legal assistant at Wiggins, Childs, Quinn and Pantazis before being called to St Michael's in Huffman, where he retired in 2009.

References

  • Barbour, Grady (2009) "Author" profile at "Manna For Episcopalians"