Difference between revisions of "2021 Birmingham budget"

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[[Mayor of Birmingham|Mayor]] [[Randall Woodfin]] proposed to the [[Birmingham City Council]] that it plan to continue operating under the [[2020 Birmingham budget]] for a few months so that his office could better understand the fiscal impacts of the [[2020 Coronavirus pandemic]] and make preparations for a significant reduction for the next year. He proposed submitting a proposal on [[August 20]] with the aim of passing a budget before [[October 1]]. The delay would also potentially better allow for public hearings to be conducted in a safe manner.
 
[[Mayor of Birmingham|Mayor]] [[Randall Woodfin]] proposed to the [[Birmingham City Council]] that it plan to continue operating under the [[2020 Birmingham budget]] for a few months so that his office could better understand the fiscal impacts of the [[2020 Coronavirus pandemic]] and make preparations for a significant reduction for the next year. He proposed submitting a proposal on [[August 20]] with the aim of passing a budget before [[October 1]]. The delay would also potentially better allow for public hearings to be conducted in a safe manner.
  
In mid-June 2020, finance director [[Lester Smith]] suggested that the anticipated loss of revenues for FY 2021 would be around $73 million. Dipping into the city's $75 million "rainy day fund" would help offset those losses, but Woodfin expressed that he preferred to address most of the shortage with spending cuts distributed across all city departments. In letters dated June 19, Woodfin notified community groups, boards and non-profits to expect significant cutbacks in financial support and in-kind services, including free rentals and security for events.
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In mid-June 2020, finance director [[Lester Smith]] suggested that the anticipated loss of revenues for FY 2021 would be around $73 million. Dipping into the city's $75 million "rainy day fund" would help offset those losses, but Woodfin expressed that he preferred to address most of the shortage with spending cuts distributed across all city departments. In letters dated June 19, Woodfin notified community groups, boards and non-profits to expect significant cutbacks in financial support and in-kind services, including free rentals and security for events. On [[June 30]] he sent an email to all city employees notifying them that the budget did not have room for merit, longevity or cost-of-living raises.
  
 
==References==
 
==References==
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* Prickett, Sam (June 16, 2020) "[https://birminghamwatch.org/city-birmingham-facing-economic-crisis-falling-revenue-pandemic City of Birmingham Facing ‘Economic Crisis’ Over Falling Revenue From Pandemic]" ''BirminghamWatch''
 
* Prickett, Sam (June 16, 2020) "[https://birminghamwatch.org/city-birmingham-facing-economic-crisis-falling-revenue-pandemic City of Birmingham Facing ‘Economic Crisis’ Over Falling Revenue From Pandemic]" ''BirminghamWatch''
 
* Beahm, Anna (June 22, 2020) "Woodfin says city will trim in-kind services; alerts groups to ‘drastic’ cuts." {{BN}}
 
* Beahm, Anna (June 22, 2020) "Woodfin says city will trim in-kind services; alerts groups to ‘drastic’ cuts." {{BN}}
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* Beahm, Anna (June 30, 2020) "Pandemic kills planned pay hikes for Birmingham city workers." {{BN}}
  
 
{{DEFAULTSORT:2021 budget}}
 
{{DEFAULTSORT:2021 budget}}
 
[[Category:2020 works]]
 
[[Category:2020 works]]
 
[[Category:Birmingham budgets]]
 
[[Category:Birmingham budgets]]

Latest revision as of 12:28, 30 June 2020

The 2020-2021 Birmingham budget includes the operating budget for the City of Birmingham for the fiscal year July 1, 2019June 30, 2020 as well as a capital projects budget.

Mayor Randall Woodfin proposed to the Birmingham City Council that it plan to continue operating under the 2020 Birmingham budget for a few months so that his office could better understand the fiscal impacts of the 2020 Coronavirus pandemic and make preparations for a significant reduction for the next year. He proposed submitting a proposal on August 20 with the aim of passing a budget before October 1. The delay would also potentially better allow for public hearings to be conducted in a safe manner.

In mid-June 2020, finance director Lester Smith suggested that the anticipated loss of revenues for FY 2021 would be around $73 million. Dipping into the city's $75 million "rainy day fund" would help offset those losses, but Woodfin expressed that he preferred to address most of the shortage with spending cuts distributed across all city departments. In letters dated June 19, Woodfin notified community groups, boards and non-profits to expect significant cutbacks in financial support and in-kind services, including free rentals and security for events. On June 30 he sent an email to all city employees notifying them that the budget did not have room for merit, longevity or cost-of-living raises.

References