Slayton & Mauldin saloon

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The Slayton & Mauldin saloon was a black-owned saloon for black customers operated by Thomas Slayton and A. W. Mauldin in the Davidson Building at 311 19th Street North (or 1905 3rd Avenue North) from April 12 to July 1, 1899.

The partners operated a saloon together on West 9th Street in Chattanooga, Tennessee in 1898 and early 1899. In March 1899 they came to Birmingham and prepared to open a new bar. Several nearby property owners began a petition to the Birmingham Board of Aldermen to deny them a license, but it was never presented. The bar opened on April 12 and was said to be, "run in a perfectly orderly manner".

At a meeting on April 20 the matter was brought up by Alderman R. H. Kerr, who offered a resolution to revoke the business license under a clause that permitted the board to, "revoke and cancel any license issued for the sale of spirituous, vinous, or malt liquors...when in the opinion of the board, the public safety, peace, good order or decency may require."

Mayor Frank Evans explained that he was not aware of any reason he should not have granted the license, but Alderman James McKnight brought to his attention that the board had resolved to take up such decisions for itself unless the license was a renewal from a previous year. Alderman H. Hentschel spoke up against denying a license, "because the parties were negroes."

Though Slayton & Mauldin were represented by an attorney at the meeting, no opportunity of a hearing was offered and the board voted to revoke the license, instructing the mayor to carry out the resolution. Evans appeared at the business on Monday prepared to refund the cost of the license, but his money was refused. Evans was preparing to have them arrested, but agreed to a truce suggested by attorney Hustis Abernathy to revisit the matter at the next board meeting.

On May 17, 1899 the Birmingham Board of Aldermen passed a resolution submitted by John Altman forcing the business to vacate and cease operating on July 1.

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