Stanley Robinson

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Stanley Earl Robinson (born July 14, 1988 in Birmingham; died July 22, 2020 in Birmingham) was professional basketball player in Canada, Spain and Chile.

Robinson attended Woodlawn High School as a freshman, and averaged 13.5 points per game for the Colonels basketball team. He transferred to Huffman High School before his sophomore year. During his senior year under coach Tyrone Belcher he led the Vikings to the AHSAA 6A Final Four and was named "Mr Basketball" by the Alabama Sports Writers Association. Parade magazine and EA Sports both named him to their "All-American" second teams.

Robinson accepted a scholarship to attend the University of Connecticut and was a standout player for the Huskies basketball team. He appeared in all 31 games as a freshman and became a regular starter as a sophomore, averaging 10.4 points and 6.5 rebounds per game. Personal issues led coach Jim Calhoun to suspend Robinson after the season, requiring him to work his way back to reclaim his scholarship. He returned late in the season and helped the team reach the Final Four of the 2009 NCAA tournament. During his senior season he averaged 14.5 points and 7.6 rebounds per game. He finished his Connecticut career as the school's 30th leading all-time scorer with 1,231 points.

Robinson was selected by the Orlando Magic as the 59th overall pick in the 2010 NBA Draft. He signed a non-guaranteed one-year contract, but was waived after training camp. He played the 20112012 season with the Iowa Energy of the NBA Development League.

In 2013 Robinson signed with the Moncton Miracles of the Canadian National Basketball League, but missed most of the season with an injury. In 2015 he signed with Leones de Quilpué of the Liga Nacional de Básquetbol de Chile. In 2017 he signed with Keflavík of the Úrvalsdeild karla league in Iceland, and in 2018 he returned to Chile and signed with Puerto Montt.

Robinson died in July 2020 at his home in Powderly. He was survived by three children.

References