Shug Jordan

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Shug Jordan

James Ralph "Shug" Jordan (September 25, 1910 - July 17, 1980) was the winningest football coach at Auburn University. The university's Jordan-Hare Stadium is named in his honor.

Born in Selma, Alabama, Jordan was nicknamed "Shug" as a child because of his love for sugar cane. A 1932 graduate of Auburn, he lettered in football, baseball, and basketball while there and was voted the Most Outstanding Athlete in 1932. He was a member of Theta Chi Fraternity. After graduation, he became the head basketball coach, and an assistant football coach at Auburn. In ten seasons (1934-1942, 1945-1946) as the head basketball coach, he compiled a record of 95-77. In addition to being the winningest football coach in Auburn history, Jordan ranks fifth in wins among Tigers basketball coaches.

During World War II, he saw significant action in North Africa and Sicily before being wounded in the invasion of Normandy and receiving a Purple Heart and the Bronze Star. He continued in action in the Pacific theater after recovering.

Prior to being hired as Auburn's head football coach in 1951, he spent one season as an assistant coach of the Miami Seahawks of the All-America Football Conference, then four years as an assistant at the University of Georgia. In his first season, he coached the Tigers to a 5-5 record improving on the previous five straight losing seasons. After six years of Jordan's leadership, Auburn won its first SEC and AP national championships in 1957 with an undefeated record.

In 1971, Jordan's tutelage led quarterback Pat Sullivan to the Heisman Trophy. The next year, Jordan's Tigers upset heavily-favored, arch-rival Alabama in the Iron Bowl - a victory which became known by the nickname "Punt Bama Punt". In 1973, the university renamed Cliff Hare Stadium to Jordan-Hare Stadium in his honor making it the first stadium in the U.S. to be named for an active coach. When Jordan retired after the 1975 season he had amassed an enviable record of 176-83-6 for a .675 percentage and 22 winning seasons out of the 25 he had coached.

Preceded by:
Earl Brown
Auburn University Head Football Coach
19511975
Succeeded by:
Doug Barfield
Preceded by:
Sam McAllister
Auburn University Head Men's Basketball Coach
19331943
Succeeded by:
Bob Evans

Basketball Coaching Record

TEAM YEAR WINS LOSSES
Auburn University 1933-1934 2 11
Auburn University 1934-1935 4 13
Auburn University 1935-1936 10 7
Auburn University 1936-1937 11 4
Auburn University 1937-1938 14 5
Auburn University 1938-1939 16 6
Auburn University 1939-1940 7 10
Auburn University 1940-1941 13 6
Auburn University 1941-1942 11 6
Auburn University 1945-1946 7 9
CAREER TOTAL (BASKETBALL) 10 years 95 77

Football Coaching Record

TEAM YEAR (Bowl Game) WINS LOSSES TIES
Auburn University 1951 5 5 0
Auburn University 1952 2 8 0
Auburn University 1953 (Gator Bowl) 7 3 1
Auburn University 1954 (Gator Bowl) 8 3 0
Auburn University 1955 (Gator Bowl) 8 2 1
Auburn University 1956 7 3 0
Auburn University 1957 (SEC and National Co-Champions) 10 0 0
Auburn University 1958 9 0 1
Auburn University 1959 7 3 0
Auburn University 1960 8 2 0
Auburn University 1961 6 4 0
Auburn University 1962 6 3 1
Auburn University 1963 (Orange Bowl) 9 2 0
Auburn University 1964 6 4 0
Auburn University 1965 (Liberty Bowl) 5 5 1
Auburn University 1966 4 6 0
Auburn University 1967 6 4 0
Auburn University 1968 (Sun Bowl) 7 4 0
Auburn University 1969 (Bluebonnet Bowl) 8 3 0
Auburn University 1970 (Gator Bowl) 9 2 0
Auburn University 1971 (Sugar Bowl) 9 2 0
Auburn University 1972 (Gator Bowl) 10 1 0
Auburn University 1973 (Sun Bowl) 6 6 0
Auburn University 1974 (Gator Bowl) 10 2 0
Auburn University 1975 4 6 1
CAREER TOTAL (FOOTBALL) 25 years 176 83 6

Honors and awards

References

  • "Ralph Jordan (February 17, 2007) Wikipedia - accessed February 20, 2007

External links